For Lisa Bianchini, playing soccer for the University of Maryland was the ultimate goal. She knew the Terrapin’s turf was where she wanted to call home. Though the journey of her collegiate career posed obstacles, Bianchini refused to let them stop her from becoming a Terp.

“Sometimes I didn’t think that I was going to be successful enough to do it, but I was. I kept faith, and it happened,” said Bianchini, a senior forward for the University of Maryland’s women soccer team. “I’m proud of myself for coming as far as I have.”

From Terp fan to Terp family, Bianchini developed into a valuable member of the Maryland women’s soccer team and a member of the Terrapin family for life.

Growing up near the university, Bianchini practiced Terrapin traditions from a young age.

“I’ve always been a Terp fan,” said Bianchini, who recalls Saturday mornings spent at football tailgates with her family as a favorite childhood memory.

Bianchini has had a passion for soccer for as long as she’s loved the Terps. In order to take the field with the Terrapin team, however, she had to overcome some challenges.

“I thought that starting at a two-year school would be a better start for me academically,” said Bianchini, reflecting on her decision to begin her post-secondary education at Howard Community College. “I don’t think I was ready to come to a four-year school yet.”

Even with a focus on academics, Bianchini excelled in athletics on the HCC Dragons’ women’s soccer team under Coach Kate Seagroves.

“She was an immediate impact for us,” said Seagroves of Bianchini.

An accomplished player, Bianchini was a second-team National Junior College Athletic Association All-American in 2013. She followed that with a first-team NJCAA All-America honor the subsequent season.

In 2014, Bianchini also received the Howard Community College Female Athlete of the Year award as a two-sport athlete for soccer and lacrosse. Her dynamic performances allowed her to switch between teams with ease, establishing her physical talents.

She had to work harder, though, to equalize her academic abilities with her athletic skills.

“I admire her determination, and her ability to get through any adversity to achieve a goal,” said Seagroves, who, along with the other HCC coaches, strengthened Bianchini in her third semester at Howard to advance her to the University of Maryland.

“My coaches at Howard prepared me a lot and trained me for this,” said Bianchini, as a current University of Maryland student. “Without them, I couldn’t have done it.”

Though coaches helped Bianchini progress on her collegiate soccer course, family is at the heart of her sporting journey.

“My family has given me everything when it comes to soccer,” said Bianchini. “They sacrificed countless hours and time taking me to practices and tournaments leading up to my collegiate career.”

Now, with Ludwig Field as home turf, Bianchini’s family and friends were able to show their support for her and the local team. Bianchini’s biggest fans, her parents, demonstrate longstanding Terp pride, as well as pride in their daughter.

“It was awesome to see that her fiercely competitive and tireless work ethic paid off,” said Kim Bianchini, Lisa’s mother, and an 11-year University of Maryland employee. “It's been a joy to watch her play.”

The Terp transfer appreciates the opportunity to advance her skills at Maryland and recognizes the importance of her position both as a player and a student.

“It’s a lot more demanding in every aspect,” said Bianchini. “Just being part of a team at a four-year school comes with a lot more responsibility. It’s a bigger commitment.”

Bianchini, however, thrives as a Terp.

In her two seasons playing for Maryland, Bianchini has recorded 19 shots, one goal (the game-winner vs. Michigan State in 2015) and one assist.

“To know she has grown into a big player for the University of Maryland, all while working a job, and holding a 3.5 GPA, is pretty amazing,” said Seagroves.

Bianchini’s soccer career may have come to an end, but her time as a Terp continues. The kinesiology major seeks to earn a master’s degree in education from the University of Maryland, with hopes of becoming a physical education teacher.

When asked where she predicts to be in the future, Bianchini replied that she’d like to stay local, citing proximity to loved-ones as a large factor in determining where she begins her career. Bianchini shows affection to her friends and family, who show pride for her accomplishments and encourage her ongoing success.

“She is extremely family oriented and always available for a friend,” said Kim Bianchini. “We are so proud of the fine young woman she has become.”

Regardless of where Bianchini chooses to pursue the next phase of her life, she can count on the support of her family, including her Terp family, to aid her in achieving her dreams.

Living The Dream is a special presentation of umterps.com.

 

Alyssa Haduck is a junior majoring in communications and romance languages at the University of Maryland and is a contributing writer to umterps.com.

 

All rights reserved.

For Lisa Bianchini, playing soccer for the University of Maryland was the ultimate goal. She knew the Terrapin’s turf was where she wanted to call home. Though the journey of her collegiate career posed obstacles, Bianchini refused to let them stop her from becoming a Terp.

“Sometimes I didn’t think that I was going to be successful enough to do it, but I was. I kept faith, and it happened,” said Bianchini, a senior forward for the University of Maryland’s women soccer team. “I’m proud of myself for coming as far as I have.”

From Terp fan to Terp family, Bianchini developed into a valuable member of the Maryland women’s soccer team and a member of the Terrapin family for life.

Growing up near the university, Bianchini practiced Terrapin traditions from a young age.

“I’ve always been a Terp fan,” said Bianchini, who recalls Saturday mornings spent at football tailgates with her family as a favorite childhood memory.

Bianchini has had a passion for soccer for as long as she’s loved the Terps. In order to take the field with the Terrapin team, however, she had to overcome some challenges.

“I thought that starting at a two-year school would be a better start for me academically,” said Bianchini, reflecting on her decision to begin her post-secondary education at Howard Community College. “I don’t think I was ready to come to a four-year school yet.”

Even with a focus on academics, Bianchini excelled in athletics on the HCC Dragons’ women’s soccer team under Coach Kate Seagroves.

“She was an immediate impact for us,” said Seagroves of Bianchini.

An accomplished player, Bianchini was a second-team National Junior College Athletic Association All-American in 2013. She followed that with a first-team NJCAA All-America honor the subsequent season.

In 2014, Bianchini also received the Howard Community College Female Athlete of the Year award as a two-sport athlete for soccer and lacrosse. Her dynamic performances allowed her to switch between teams with ease, establishing her physical talents.

She had to work harder, though, to equalize her academic abilities with her athletic skills.

“I admire her determination, and her ability to get through any adversity to achieve a goal,” said Seagroves, who, along with the other HCC coaches, strengthened Bianchini in her third semester at Howard to advance her to the University of Maryland.

“My coaches at Howard prepared me a lot and trained me for this,” said Bianchini, as a current University of Maryland student. “Without them, I couldn’t have done it.”

Though coaches helped Bianchini progress on her collegiate soccer course, family is at the heart of her sporting journey.

“My family has given me everything when it comes to soccer,” said Bianchini. “They sacrificed countless hours and time taking me to practices and tournaments leading up to my collegiate career.”

Now, with Ludwig Field as home turf, Bianchini’s family and friends were able to show their support for her and the local team. Bianchini’s biggest fans, her parents, demonstrate longstanding Terp pride, as well as pride in their daughter.

“It was awesome to see that her fiercely competitive and tireless work ethic paid off,” said Kim Bianchini, Lisa’s mother, and an 11-year University of Maryland employee. “It's been a joy to watch her play.”

The Terp transfer appreciates the opportunity to advance her skills at Maryland and recognizes the importance of her position both as a player and a student.

“It’s a lot more demanding in every aspect,” said Bianchini. “Just being part of a team at a four-year school comes with a lot more responsibility. It’s a bigger commitment.”

Bianchini, however, thrives as a Terp.

In her two seasons playing for Maryland, Bianchini has recorded 19 shots, one goal (the game-winner vs. Michigan State in 2015) and one assist.

“To know she has grown into a big player for the University of Maryland, all while working a job, and holding a 3.5 GPA, is pretty amazing,” said Seagroves.

Bianchini’s soccer career may have come to an end, but her time as a Terp continues. The kinesiology major seeks to earn a master’s degree in education from the University of Maryland, with hopes of becoming a physical education teacher.

When asked where she predicts to be in the future, Bianchini replied that she’d like to stay local, citing proximity to loved-ones as a large factor in determining where she begins her career. Bianchini shows affection to her friends and family, who show pride for her accomplishments and encourage her ongoing success.

“She is extremely family oriented and always available for a friend,” said Kim Bianchini. “We are so proud of the fine young woman she has become.”

Regardless of where Bianchini chooses to pursue the next phase of her life, she can count on the support of her family, including her Terp family, to aid her in achieving her dreams.

For Lisa Bianchini, playing soccer for the University of Maryland was the ultimate goal. She knew the Terrapin’s turf was where she wanted to call home. Though the journey of her collegiate career posed obstacles, Bianchini refused to let them stop her from becoming a Terp.

“Sometimes I didn’t think that I was going to be successful enough to do it, but I was. I kept faith, and it happened,” said Bianchini, a senior forward for the University of Maryland’s women soccer team. “I’m proud of myself for coming as far as I have.”